back to previous page

home

Contact INGEDE


Press Release 3/96

INGEDE and Axel Springer Verlag search chlorine-free yellow rotogravure ink

Co-operation with pigment and printing ink manufacturers looks for technical methods for implementation

Printing inks as used to print colour magazines or catalogues mainly contain two components: pigments and fixing agents. The pigments yield the colour by absorbing specific wavelengths from the light and reflecting only part of the light spectrum—e.g., yellow light. Pigments absorbing the proper parts of the light for a yellow gravure ink and showing additional optimum properties currently still contain chlorine. Chlorine, however, may impair utilisation of deinking sludge obtained from paper recycling. Now, at the instigation of INGEDE and led by Axel Springer Verlag, a working group has been founded to find and test in praxi potential alternatives to chloric yellow. It shall be examined whether the use of chlorine-free yellow pigments in catalogue and magazine printing is ecologically useful, technically feasible and economically viable.

The key step with regard to recovering fibres from wastepaper for the manufacture of new paper is deinking, i.e. the removal of printing ink. In the deinking process, the pigments are removed from the fibres. The desired concentration of printing inks also results in a accumulation of attendant materials which, in turn, have a negative impact on some ways of utilisation of the sludge. Some brickworks utilising the deinking sludge rich in aluminium and fibres as a popular aggregate in brick production, prescribe maximum permissible chlorine levels. This is due to the fact that under the conditions prevailing in a brickwork, chlorine is converted into chloride which may induce corrosion of plant components.

Yellow printing inks with chlorine-free yellow pigments tested in the laboratory so far could not meet the required standards as to shade of colour, intensity of colour and further processing with modern printing machines. Within the framework of a pilot project, various aspects of utilisation under the conditions prevailing in the daily printing practice as well as the effects on deinking and remaining substances shall be examined. Representatives of pigment and printing ink manufacturers, Otto Versand*, Axel Springer Verlag and INGEDE have agreed on these objectives.

Both pigment and printing ink manufacturers undertake to find a printing ink formulation suited for gravure printing. Otto Versand will supply the required printer’s copies which will serve as a basis for the assessment of test results, since catalogues are among the printing products with the highest demands on printing ink. Printing shall be performed in the printing plant of the Axel Springer Verlag at Ahrensburg. Finally, INGEDE will have the printing products tested as to their suitability for deinking and the remaining substances obtained during the deinking process.

All participants are interested in an ecological optimisation of the production and utilisation chain for printing products. Thus, they do not wish to merely look into the question of potential damage to the environment caused by chloric yellow pigments, but also to intensify their efforts to find viable alternatives.

However, a final ecological evaluation of chlorine-free pigments as compared with conventional yellow pigments is not available so far. It might be possible that the apparent advantages to the environment due to the use of chlorine-free substances are compensated or even overcompensated by differences in their syntheses.

INGEDE is an association of leading European paper manufacturers aiming at promoting utilisation of wastepaper and improving the conditions for an extended use of wastepaper.

18 September 1996

If you have any questions we will try to help you.


back to previous page

home

Contact INGEDE


Last update: 28 Feb 1998